Skip to main content

About your Search

20120502
20120502
SHOW
( more )
STATION
CSPAN3 36
MSNBC 22
MSNBCW 22
CNN 18
CNNW 18
FOXNEWS 18
CSPAN2 8
WUSA (CBS) 8
CSPAN 7
KQED (PBS) 7
SFGTV 7
KGO (ABC) 6
KPIX (CBS) 6
WHUT (Howard University Television) 6
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 282
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 282 (some duplicates have been removed)
for attacks against the united states. >> thank you. let me just conclude by saying that former cia director mike hayden used used the analogy of a football field, the lines on the football field, and he talked about our intelligence operatives and others as the players on the field. and he said we need them to get chalk on their cleats, go right up to the line in carrying out what our approved policies of the united states. and if you think about it that way, it is really important to have policies that are transparent so that those who are carrying out the mission and those in the united states and those around the world who are trying to understand the mission know where the lines are. if we don't know what the lines are, some people will be risk averse, other people commit excesses. we have certain seeing a few of those, which are black eyes on our country. so i just want to applaud the fact that john brennan has come over here from the white house, spent over an hour with us, laying out in great detail what the rules are for something that has been revealed today, which is the use of dr
the president of the united states turned out to be a dlib fabrication because for sduecury reasons he made a trip under the veil of secrecy. this is standard operating procedure for presidents visiting america's various war zones. shortly after the 2008 election in which he was elected president, after the election but before the new president had been sworn in in december of 2008, then still president george w. bush took one of these surprise trips the, unannounced trips to background. it was december 14th, 2008. that's when this happened. >> yes. everybody calm down for a minute. first of all, thank you for apologizing on behalf of the iraqi people. it doesn't bother me. if you want the facts, it's a size 10 shoe that he threw. >> boy, if you were not surprised enough to find out that the president had surprise, gone to iraq, the president having a shoe hurled at him was definitely a surprise that day. when you look at the official transcript from this, we posted a link to it on our blog tonight. when you go through the transcript of this event, when you get to the part where the guy thr
was in baghdad was to sign the agreement which committed the united states to end our war in iraq. it was an agreement that president obama then followed through on. the last u.s. troops left iraq in december. today, in afghanistan it was not a status of forces agreement. it was called a strategic partnership agreement between the u.s. and afghan government but the idea is the same. it's to commit both countries to a plan by which the united states will end our war there. >> today i signed an agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation and we build an equal partnership between two states. as we move forward some people will ask why we need a firm timeline. the answer is clear. our goal is not to build a country in america's image or to eradicate the taliban. these objectives would require in many years, many more dollars and most importantly many more american lives. our goal is to destroy al qaeda and we on path to do exactly that. afghans want
. it's to commit both countries to a plan by which the united states will end our war there. >> today i signed an agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation and we build an equal partnership between two states. as we move forward some people will ask why we need a firm timeline. the answer is clear. our goal is not to build a country in america's image or to eradicate the taliban. these objectives would require in many years, many more dollars and most importantly many more american lives. our goal is to destroy al qaeda and we on path to do exactly that. afghans want to assert their sovereignty and build a lasting peace. the agreement we signed today sends a clear message to the afghan people. as you stand up, you will not stand alone. within this framework we'll work with the afghans to determine what support they need to accomplish two narrow security missions beyond 2014. counter terrorism, and continued training. we will not build permanent base
rate of undocumented population growth in the united states. simple equation in demography. net migration equals in migration minus out migration. you don't affect in migration, you dramatically reduce out migration, net migration increases. that's the sort of the rapid growth of undocumented migration into the united states. by militarizing the border with our closest trading partner, closest neighbor, with canada in the hemisphere, we didn't solve the problem of illegal migration. we made it worse. we transformed what had been a circular flow of male workers going to three states and turned it into a settled population of families living in 50 states, and double the net rate of undocumented population growth in the process. so now we have 11 million people living in this country out of status. and these people are a great loss, represent a great loss of human capital to the nation, because there is nowhere for them to go. they cannot use their skills to their utmost productivity. they cannot use their education. they are confined to a black market, informal sector in the unite
in the history of trade and taxation in the united states and is the author of several scholarly works, 19th and 20th tariff policy. long a civil war buff, his attention turned to the presidency of abraham lincoln after a fortuitous discovery at library of congress. the find marked the beginning of a four year hunt for documents culminating in his book, co-authored with sebastian page, lincoln and the movement for black resettlement. in addition to writing, dr. magnus is an academic programs director at the institute for humane studies at george mason university, also taught in public administration at american university, and international tragtional trade . also in his biography, something i find fascinating. he is an avid scuba diver. and plays underwater hockey. for the washington, d.c., and i love this name -- beltway bottom feeders. there is probably no end of applicants for that team. after dr. magnus makes his presentation, rodney ross will come to read a poem of -- of john willis menard that is very appropriate. actually there are copies, print copies of it on the table outside. rod
the united states and when i do, almost everywhere i go people, i'll ask them to raise hands. i do these informal polls. how many of you think that immigration is involved in national security and the hands go up. and rational people can argue how we're going to ration stuff. how many want flexible working conditions bi-nationally. hands go up. expand human rights, some hands go up. ours in a nation built on liberties, not on human rights but some of the things are similar. how many want a reduction in the noise along the border, all the hands go up. i will make one clarification and point here. i think, it's my experience that the border communities do suffer very significant financial cost and criminal justice law enforcement health care, education, et cetera. the nation as a whole benefits phenomenally from migration, but the cost and joys of migration are not evenly distributed. how many of you want to see a reduction in the political violence and the cartel stuff activities in mexico, all the hands go up, but we don't know quite how to deal with that and we are not willing to
to sell -- trying to explain why the united states is going to be staying in afghanistan in one form or another for another, what is it now, 12 years. i mean, that is an amazing number when you think about it. a ten-year commit many here. now this is both on the economics front and on troops and all of that is still to be negotiated. every years, there will be a lobbying effort to convince congress to fund aid programs to afghanistan. we can only imagine what some of those political fights might look like over the next decade, plus two years. that said, this isn't going to be the easiest thing for the president to be explaining tonight. this is not spiking the football. i think at first when people heard rumor the president was going to afghanistan, is he simply having an ewith the troops on the day to mark the anniversary? no, he is trying to sell the what is not the most popular policy. you know what, we will be in afghanistan longer than folks want to be. but let me say why we will be there. i don't want to repeat 1989 when the u.s. abandoned afghanistan after helping beat the sov
is canc not just here in the united states, but within afghanistan. you know, being able to come to president karzai and sign this agreement and show the afghan people the united states is going to remain engaged in the region and send a compelling message to nair neighbors that have meddled in their appars on affair, pakistan next door, the united states will be here and continue to try to help afghanistan move forward. >> thank you pj for joining us inside the war room. that is pj crowley former assist isant to the secretary of state of affairs. of and here to discuss the strategic interests of the trip and a little politics is the assistant secretary of defense for global strategic affairs in the obamaa administration and former dean of the goldman school of policy, professor doctor, thank you so much for joining us inside the war room. you heard what pj crowley said about the agreement. do you agree with the three goals you think were identified in that? and how important is the strategic interests of that agr
between china and the united states of how to resolve this so it did not flare up during the critical meetings that secretary clinton would be having in beijing. now we learned that chen has left the embassy voluntarily, is getting medical treatment here in beijing, and has been reunited with his family. andrew? >> stan, does the mere fact that xinhua is publicly reporting this, telling the chinese people what's been happening, does that suggest that chen himself could be out of danger from any sort of backlash from chinese authorities on his escape from the house arrest and that decision to go to the u.s. embassy? >> reporter: we're getting into areas of conjecture here, but you can read something from this statement. while there's been an information blackout on the chinese side, it hasn't been carried on state media, social media has been blocked. search terms connected with chen guangcheng have been blocked on the internet. while that's been happening, we've been reporting it freely on international media. as you're aware, often when we report things the chinese don't want getting
is the other part of the message, andrew. that is, this drawing the line with the united states and demanding the u.s. apologize to china for allowing one of its citizens, the chinese citizen to enter the embassy, and to give refuge to that citizen in the embassy, someone that china has considered in the past an enemy of the state. we need to put this in context and let you know about chen guangcheng, those who haven't been following this closely. he's a blind activist, a self-taught lawyer, someone who testified against forced abortions in china under the one child policy here. he spent four years in prison after organizing demonstrations, allegedly disrupting traffic and damaging property. after coming out of prison, he's been held the past 18 months under lock and key 24/7 house arrest. only in the last week or so did he manage to escape and get into beijing, touching off the events we've seen unfold in recent days, leading to the fact now that apparently he's out of the embassy getting treatment, reuniting with his family at a beijing medical facility. >> stan, thank you very much for tha
, it's vitaly important. this had political significance not just here in the united states but, also within afghanistan. you know, being able to come to president karzai, sign this agreement, show the afghan people that the united states is going to, you know, remain engaged in the region and, also send a compelling message to other neighbors who have metalled in afghan affairs but pakistan, you know, next door, that the united states is going to be hear and it's going to try to continue to help afghanistanyou know, next door, that the united states is going to be hear and it's going to try to continue to help afghanistan. >> thank you p.j. crawley forker assistant of state for public affairs. the president's announced trip comes four days before he officially kicks off his re-election campaign. here to discuss the strategic interest of the trip and, perhaps, a little bit of politics, too, is michael knott, the assistant secretary of defense for global strategic affairs in the obama administration now and then a prevention-off of public policy, form
are consistent because the president believes al qaeda's leadership can be wiped out freeing the united states to focus on targeted strikes in places like yemen. >> it is a long war with requiring of a long-term commitment which is what the president signaled. >> as corruption continues inside karzai's government, and americans shell out $289 million a day there, the public is weary. the latest fox poll shows that 78 percent of registered voters approve of withdrawing u.s. troops. >> that's why republicans are urging the president to speak up about the war more, shore up support, and prepare the american people for tough difficulties ahead before last night, the president had not given a major speech on afghanistan in nearly a year. >>bret: thank you, ed, from the north lawn. stocks were mixed. the dow jones industrial average lost 11 and the s&p 500 lost 3 1/2. unemployment in the euro zone is now higher than it has ever been since the creation of the currency. spain is leading the way with a quarter of the workers not working. and now we have that story from madrid. >>greg: the prime ministe
combat troops go home. >> today i signed a historic agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new kind of relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation, and we build an equal partnership between two sovereign states. >> obama and afghan president karzai signed a strategic partnership agreement. it cements of u.s. commitment to afghanistan after american combat troops leave in 2014. it will be effective until 2024. the deal allows u.s. forces to train afghan soldiers and engage in sweep operations against al qaeda. >> our goal is to destroy al qaeda, and we are on a path to do exactly that. >> this was obama's first visit to afghanistan since december 2010, and a third since he took office. it coincided with the one-year anniversary of the death of al qaeda leader osama bin laden. >>> the u.n. security council is considering black listing about 40 more north korean companies. the new sanctions would be in response to pyongyang's failed launch of what it called a sat lie-carrying rocket. the council
for the absolute, full, and complete end of slavery. you know, every slave in the united states immediately. and the people who are very active in this movement are often devout protestants, blacks and whites, men and women, people from all parts of the united states. but we must always remember that this is a small number of people. this was never a mainstream movement. this was never a mass movement. and students from our perspective today -- you know, when we look back at this, we would say, well, of course slavery should end. of course slavery should be abolished. you know, all thinking adults today would agree on that. and slavery is illegal everywhere now. the last country to abolish slavery was actually saudi arab arabia, which abolished slavery in 1962. 1962, not 1862. so it's been a long, hard struggle. but slavery is illegal now everywhere. but to say these things in the 1830s and '40s and '50s took a lot of courage. this took a lot of guts. this is not mainstream opinion. this is going against mainstream opinion. these people are at the cutting edge of reform. these people are in
. a lot of afghans have been concerned about how the united states will remain here. this agreement basically says that we commit ourselves to supporting afghanistan economically. you know, we'll support its development and we will retain a number of troops here in a counterterrorism role in the post-2014 environment. mostly to chase after what's left of al qaeda. but this is a... signifies sort of a long-term commitment of the united states to afghanistan and more broadly to the region. >> ifill: even in the negotiating of this agreement, there have been tensions. of course we have documented all the tensions in the u.s.-afghan relationship, specifically with president karzai. was any of that in evidence today? >> not really. i think president karzai got pretty much what he wanted for his own domest audience, his contingency. let's not forget that we had these very controversial night raids that they wanted the afghans to take the lead on. we signed a memorandum of understanding with the afghan government on that. there was a detainee issue which was a big sticking point, a memoran
right now. a short time later, just about half an hour ago, mr. obama spoke to the united states laying out his vision for ending america's longest war. saying afghanistan is where the war began and where it will end. here's a portion of his address. >> today i signed a historic agreement between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new kind of relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation and we build an equal partnership between two sovereign states. a future in which war ends and new chapter begins. ten years ago, the united states and our allies went to war to make sure that al qaeda could never again use this country to launch attacks against us. despite initial success, for a number of reasons, this war has taken longer than most anticipated. over the last three years, the tide has turned. we broke the taliban's momentum. we built strong afghan security forces. we devastated al qaeda's leadership, taking out over 20 of their leaders. one year ago, from the base here in afghanistan, our troops launched the
by the united states. wait until you here his story and the state department's response. >>> thirteen people are charged in the death of a florida drum major. >>> tonight's truth follows the money and tells you just where the obama and romney campaigns believe the presidential election will be decided. >>> in china, just as secretary of state hillary clinton arrived for a round of delegates, a chinese human rights activist left the protection of the u.s. embassy in beijing. the united states says he received assurances he would be treated humanely. later, he spoke by phone and told a very different and much darker story. he says, u.s. officials broke promises to have someone with him as he received medical treatment. >> translator: the embassy kept lobbying me to leave and promised to have people stay with me in the hospital. this afternoon, as soon as i checked in the hospital room, i noticed they were all gone. >> stan joins us live from beijing. tell us more about this phone call in which chen says he was misled, double crossed. >> a phone call at 3:00 a.m. beijing time, he was sitting up
activist left the protection of the u.s. embassy in beijing. the united states says he received assurances he would be treated humanely. later, he spoke by phone and told a very different and much darker story. he says, u.s. officials broke promises to have someone with him as he received medical treatment. >> translator: the embassy kept lobbying me to leave and promised to have people stay with me in the hospital. this afternoon, as soon as i checked in the hospital room, i noticed they were all gone. >> stan joins us live from beijing. tell us more about this phone call in which chen says he was misled, double crossed. >> a phone call at 3:00 a.m. beijing time, he was sitting up in his hospital room afraid for his life. his wife was by his side. she was telling me, she could not even leave the room. that's how scared she was. all of this unfolded after he left the u.s. embassy earlier in the day. he had been hold up there for the past six days after fleeing house arrest. he was allowed to leave of his own volition. they took him to a hospital. at that point, things started to change. th
a republican with enough working digits to handle a been and become president of the united states. >> that was the most shameless statement by the tax cutting right by what they need in the white house. someone to cut the taxes and stay out of the way of anyone else. i was in the room for that speech, and i thought, they really don't think they need a president. you may think that's human being rouse on his part, and to some extent it is. >> who came up with that word? >> i thought he -- >> okay, it means smart alac. >> if you look at the primaries and everybody grover gets to sign, then he is right. this is the core of the republican philosophy, a hard line on taxes, simple to understand, jon huntsman did not sign it, and he went nowhere. so what grover is saying yes it's full of pride, but it also happens to be true. >> every time i go to a business convention that you probably love to go to, the reward weekends for these guys they all play golf and their all for tax cuts. and they all like this guy. and every member of congress, all of the candidates for president signed this t
a republican with enough working digits to handle a pen to become president of the united states. >> okay, so -- i mean, i agree. that's just hot, fun rhetoric in front of a cpac crowd. what's your point? >> i just read a peace about your party and what's going on in the last four or five years, and what's going on, is this guy has been dictating a new style of party. they tell you no tax increases, more tax cuts for the rich -- >> this is a consistent -- >> wait a minute, chris. this is consistent with where republicans have been for generations for years on tax cuts. >> that's true, ronald reagan was able to make compromises all through his presidency. >> but when he ran he talked about the tax cuts. there's a difference between candidate and president. >> the party has changed and the process of the party has changed. the party has changed. >> i think a lot of people think this guy, mitt romney who looks good, has everything right with the family. this guy doesn't have a lot of interest or philosophies. they see a guy basically for a businessman's point of view, and doesn't have a foreign
it all started, where osama bin laden's followers trained for the 9/11 attack, where the united states retaliated with a war now in its 11th year, where nearly 2,000 american forces have died and tonight, president barack obama signed an agreement committing the united states to support afghanistan for years to come. the president's trip was kept secret until he arrived tuesday afternoon washington time. he thanked american troops for progress in afghanistan, noting the anniversary. >> not only were we able to drive al-qaeda out of afghanistan, and a year ago, we were able to finally bring osama bin laden to justice. >> reporter: but in an evening address beamed back to the united states, the president said there may be a role for another terror group. >> my administration has been in direct discussions with the taliban. we have made it clear that they can be a part of the future if they break with al-qaeda, renounce violence and abide by afghan laws. >> reporter: he signed an agreement with afghanistan's president that promises american support for a decade after 2014 after nato troop
? >> god bless you. god bless the united states of america. now i want to shake some hands. >> the breaking news at this hour is that president obama is on his way back to the united states after his address to the nation from bagram airfield in afghanistan on the one-year anniversary of s.e.a.l. team six's successful mission to get osama bin laden. tonight the commander-in-chief hailed the united states military's accomplishments in afghanistan. >> we broke the taliban's momentum. we built strong afghan security forces. we devastated al qaeda's leadership taking out over 20 of their top 30 leaders. and one year ago, from a base here in afghanistan, our troops launched the operation that killed osama bin laden. the bold goal that i set to defeat al qaeda and deny it a chance to rebuild is now within our reach. >> the president then described the path forward for the united states after its combat troops withdraw from afghanistan by the end of 2014. >> emerge from a decade of conflict abroad and economic crisis at home. it's time to renew america. an america where our children live free from
the noose himself for the sole reason that he was an american citizen. the united states consulate at kingston noticed that an american was among the accused and began putting pressure on the british government to release him. this was achieved on the same day that samuel clark, his associate, is also brought up and executed in a similar manner as gordon. the u.s. consul takes menard, whisks him away to kingston and places him on the next ship bound to new orleans. under u.s. government purchase, they bought him the ticket. menard's wife and young child were left behind in kingston. he didn't even have time to say good-bye to her, which comes up later in his career. he does reunite with the family and they are able to make it out of jamaica and to new orleans. when he leaves jamaica, is brought to new orleans, his stock rises instantly in the british empire as an eyewitness to the events that have just happened. this is an excerpt of a letter that he wrote to john stuart mill, the famous english classical liberal, sometimes member of parliament and intellectual leader of the mid-19
, from all over the united states. not just from states with big slave populations, which is what we might expect, but even in free states. in states where slavery had been abolished during a revolution or soon after the revolution there was still a lot of criticism. and we must remember that the past is different from the present. we must remember that the whole spectrum of political opinion is completely different from what it is today. many of the presidents are themselves slave owners. and the president of the united states in the 1830s was a very wealthy slave owner, andrew jackson. we talked about that in an earlier lecture. and jackson denounced abolitionists. he said they were dangerous, they were incendiaries, they were trying to harm the united states, they were trying to harm american society. so this is something that is a hard fight for abolitionists in this generation. and the 19th century has been called by historians the century of emancipation because this fight takes place in many different societies. and it's a hard fight everywhere. and everywhere slave owners fig
of enfranchising women, the united states is in the middle of the pack, you know, behind new zealand, 1893, the first western style democracy to enfranchise women, behind australia, behind great britain, ahead of portugal, 1976, ahead of kuwait, 2006. so the u.s. is sort of in the middle of the pack. and if elizabeth cady stanton had then told in 1888 that the female suffrage was something that was going to happen decades into the future i think she would have been disbelieving. she had a lot of confidence as did many other reformers that this was the right thing to do. it's interesting, however, that stanton doesn't mention the fact that women had already voted in a part of the united states. we talked about that in an earlier lecture. does any one remember where they used to vote? yeah, new jersey. they voted in new jersey for about a generation from the 1770s to the early 1800s then were disenfranchised, i think i mentioned this. they were disenfranchised because a member of the new jersey state legislature had lost a race earlier and he blamed it on women voters for some reason. it was
. >> meanwhile, the chinese government demand an apology from the united states. the foreign minister said: in the meantime, security was tight outside the hospital where chen is being treated, and the hospital's name was quickly banned as a search term on the chinese internet. we take a closer look now at this still unfolding story with shao chung, director of the berkeley-china internet project at u.c. berkeley, and editor of the "china digital times," an online publication. and evan osnos, who's written on chen guangcheng and other dissidents as the china correspondent for the "new yorker" magazine. he joins us tonight from the campus of stanford university. os, i'll start with you. what do you make of this very confusing series of events today? is there any way to unravel what's known at this point? >> well, it's been an extraordinary 24 hours. the story is very dynamic. a few hours ago, frankly, all of us thought that the u.s. government, the chinese side, had reached perhaps the best available solution given the moment, which was to create an opportunity for chen guangcheng to get o
between the united states and afghanistan that defines a new kind of relationship between our countries. a future in which afghans are responsible for the security of their nation, and we build an equal partnership between two sovereign states. >> ahead of the speech, he and afghan president hamid karzai signed a strategic partnership agreement. the deal cements u.s. commitment to afghanistan after 2014. that's when american combat troops are scheduled to leave the country. the agreement allows u.s. forces to train afghan soldiers and engage in sweep operations against al qaeda. >> others will ask, why don't we leave immediately? that answer is also clear -- we must give afghanistan the opportunity to stabilize. otherwise our gains could be lost. al qaeda could establish itself once more. as commander in chief, i refuse to let that happen. >> this is obama's first visit to afghanistan since december, 2010, and third sce he took office. he's currently campaigning for re-election in november. >>> aung san suu kyi and her colleagues are getting ready to take their seats in myanmar's parlia
the boarder from mexico and picked that lettuce for us, because there's -- the population of the united states there won't support that type of industry. i'm a mormon. proud to be a mormon. and russell pearce was in a heavily mormon district in arizona. and i was offended by his bigotry and his approach to hispanic people. beginningoistic approach. i come from a very right wing republican family. i, myself, have right of ging gas khan. i will tell you that when this immigration became an issue in arizona one of my brothers called me up and said, daryl, let's join the group that goes down with their guns, let get our guns and go down the board somewhere force the border policy. and i said -- now, my brother is a businessman, and i being a lawyer thought, well, let me think about this a little while. and so i began to study it out and to write an essay which is available, i think on the website. if -- or if you don't have it. if you go to my bio here in the thing, write to daryl williams i'll send awe copy of this essay because i wanted to study out what it was that made people so emotional and
. >> 10 years ago, the united states and our allies went to war to make sure that al qaeda could never again use this country to launch attacks against us. despite initial success, for a number of reasons, this war has taken longer than most anticipated. in 20 02, osama bin laden and his lieutenants established safe haven across the bordener pakistan. america spent nearly 8 years fighting a different war in iraq. and al al qaeda's extremist alls have waged a brutal insurgency. but over the last 3 years, the tide has turned. we broke the taliban's momentum. we built strong afghan security forces. we devastated al qaeda's leadership, taking out over 20 of their top 30 leaders. one year ago, from a base here in afghanistan, our troops launched the operation that killed osama bin laden. >> sean: here with reaction to the surprise presidential trip, a former bush adviser, karl rove. welcome back, sir. >> thank you, sean. thanks for having me. >> sean: i don't have a problem with the president going to afghanistan. i don't want to talk about his -- his trip in terms of politics. but his ad a
have to have some kind of framework, a strategic partnership between afghanistan and the united states. so if it wasn't this day, it would have had to have been in the next few days. i think president obama gave a very strong speech. imagine if you've been serving in afghanistan for years, i don't think it was triumphless, we've decimated a lot of al qaeda. but there's still rocky times ahead. the strategic partnership signed to only time will tell. but it was a good move to make as we head into the summer where we're going to be bringing home about 25,000 more u.s. troops. >> let's take another listen to a clip from the president's speech tonight. i agree. i don't think it was overtly. let's listen to this. >> as we emerge from a decade of conflict abroad and economic crisis at home, it's time to renew america. an america where our children live free from fear and have the skills to claim their dreams. a united america of grit and resilience. where sunlight glistens off soaring new towers in downtown manhattan and we build our future as one people, as one nation. >> let's turn to wolf
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 282 (some duplicates have been removed)